Our Ingredients – Starblast Co.

Our Ingredients


Sodium hydroxide

Sodium hydroxide has been used for soapmaking since ancient times.  In nature, lye, or sodium hydroxide, comes from hard wood ashes and is produced when the ashes are boiled with soft water.  The current manufacturing process of NaOH is much more controlled and industrial, however, it is still an ingredient that can be made in nature.  Sodium hydroxide is a caustic alkaline that reacts with acid content in oils and fats to produce a salt and glycerol.  The salt is what we know as soap.  When used correctly, all the sodium hydroxide is completely converted until there is no trace of the caustic ingredient.

 

Oils

Apricot Kernel Oil, Prunus armeniaca

One of the more luxurious oils in our shelves, apricot kernel oil is high in vitamin A and vitamin E which boosts collagen production and induce antioxidant activity. We love using apricot kernel oil in our products because it highly resembles the natural sebum of your skin, meaning it does not feel too heavy.  Your skin absorbs it super quickly leaving a satin feel.   This oil has proven to work as a skin curative for healing & repair, photoaging, and dryness.  In our soaps, apricot kernel oil provides a smooth and conditioning lather.  Its fatty acid content is:

  • Palmitic & Palmitoleic (16:0, 9c-16:1)
  • Stearic (18:0, 18:1)
  • Linoleic (9c, 12c-18:2)
  • Linolenic (18:3)
  • Arachidic (20:0)

 

Avocado Oil, Persea americana

Avocado oil is our favorite when it comes to sensitive skin.  It is rich in phytochemicals & phytosterols that help with absorption and conversion of important vitamins[1].  It is also considerably high in vitamins E and beta-carotene that help with photoprotective activity in the skin.  Since it is a strong emollient, avocado oil helps maintain skin elasticity, combatting photoaging with its collagen boosts and antioxidant activity.  In our soaps, avocado oil provides a nourishing and conditioning lather.  Its fatty acid content is:

  • Palmitic (16:0), Palmitoleic (9c-16:1)
  • Stearic (18:0)
  • Linoleic (9c, 12c-18:2)

 

Castor Oil, Ricinus communis

Castor oil has been used in lotions and balms since the ancient Egyptians & Chinese.   It is a thick and viscous oil that deeply penetrates the skin and aids with blood circulation to hair follicles. This oil is a staple in our shelves because it is coconut oil’s partner in crime since it is a lather booster.  Its fatty acid content is:

  • Ricinoleic
  • Palmitic (16:0)
  • Stearic (18:0)
  • Linoleic (9c, 12c-18:2)
  • Linolenic (18:3)
  • Arachidic (22:0)

 

Coconut Oil, Cocos nucifera

Everyone is obsessed with coconut oil and we are no exception.  Coconut oil is a monounsaturated fat that is a natural anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial[2], highly moisturizing and nourishing.  Due to its high lauric fatty acid content, coconut oil acts as a base in all our soaps because it provides high cleansing power.  This makes coconut oil in soap great to combat greasy skin. Ironically, its moisturizing properties do not translate to soaps because high cleansing power also means oil-stripping & drying.  To balance this, we always blend it with nourishing oils like apricot kernel or avocado.  Its fatty acid content is:

  • Caproic (6:0)
  • Caprylic (8:0)
  • Capric (10:0)
  • Lauric (12:0)
  • Myristic (14:0)
  • Palmitic (16:0)
  • Stearic (18:0)
  • Linoleic (9c, 12c-18:2)
  • Linolenic (18:3)
  • Arachidic (20:0)

 

Olive Oil, Olea europaea

Once considered “liquid gold” by the Greeks, olive oil is characterized for maintaining hair and skin supple and soft.  Although we have plenty of oils that provide soothing & moisturizing properties to the skin, olive oil distinguishes itself for its abundant oleic essential fatty acid (omega-9) content.  In our soaps, olive oil contributes to a smooth and conditioning lather.  Its fatty acid content is:

  • Myristic (14:0)
  • Palmitic (16:0)
  • Stearic (18:0)
  • Linoleic (9c, 12c-18:2)
  • Linolenic (18:3)
  • Arachidic (20:0)
  • Behenic (22:0)
  • Lignoceric (24:0)

 

Rice Bran Oil, Oryza sativa

Rice bran oil is used in our nourishing soap formulas due to the skin curative activities of its phytochemicals.  Rice bran oil is rich in squalene, a lipid that provides skin protection.  Rice bran oil aids in skin regeneration, allowing the skin to look brighter.  Its high linoleic acid (omega-6) content aids skin sensitivity and acts as an anti-inflammatory[3].  In our soaps, rice bran oil gives a luxurious creamy lather.  Its fatty acid content is:

  • Myristic (14:0)
  • Palmitic (16:0), Palmitoleic (9c-16:1)
  • Stearic (18:0)
  • Linoleic (9c, 12c-18:2)
  • Linolenic (18:3)
  • Arachidic (20:0)
  • Behenic (22:0)
  • Lignoceric (24:0)

 

Butters

Mango Butter, Mangifera Indica

Mango butter is one of the more luxurious butters in our shelves because of all the skin benefits it has to offer.  It is an anti-rash agent, anti-itch emollient that aids itching due to its phenols antibacterial activity[4].  Mango butter is used to remove blemishes and to fight aging[5]. Its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity aids skin sensitivity & skin diseases like psoriasis[6] & eczema.  Mango butter is quickly absorbed by the skin, leaving a light and satin finish.  In our soaps, mango butter provides a luxurious creamy lather.  Its fatty acid content is:

  • Lauric (12:0)
  • Myristic (14:0)
  • Palmitic (16:0), Palmitoleic (9c-16:1)
  • Stearic (18:0)
  • Linoleic (9c, 12c-18:2)
  • Linolenic (18:3)
  • Alpha-Linolenic (9c, 12c, 15c-18:3)
  • Arachidic (20:0)
  • Erucic (13c-22:1)
  • Behenic (22:0)
  • Lignoceric (24:0)

 

Shea Butter, Butyrospermum parkii

Shea butter comes from the shea nut tree in Africa.  Shea butter is a rich emollient that offers a lot of moisturization.  While it is a bit thicker on the skin than mango butter, it helps especially with dry, scaly skin while not feeling greasy.  Its high stearic acid content makes it a great emulsifying agent, good for cleansing.  In our soaps, shea butter provides a rich conditioning lather.  Its fatty acid content is:

  • Lauric (12:0)
  • Myristic (14:0)
  • Palmitic (16:0)
  • Stearic (18:0)
  • Linoleic (9c, 12c-18:2)
  • Linolenic (18:3)
  • Arachidic (20:0)

 

Essential Oils

Tangerine

Myrrh

Frankincense

Spearmint

Peppermint

Cedarwood atlas

Tea Tree

Cinnamon

Peru Balsam

 

Mineral & Plant Based Colorants

Rose kaolin clay

Activated charcoal

 

 

 

[1] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3664913/

[2] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4671521/

[3] http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/mic/health-disease/skin-health/essential-fatty-acids

[4] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4921070/

[5] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2792546/

[6] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3133503/

[7] Firestone, David.  Physical and Chemical Characteristics of Oils, Fats, and Waxes 2nd Edition